Amundi Asset Management

2019 Top 400 ranking: 9http://www.amundi.com

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Amundi

Cross Asset Investment Strategy Special Edition: Outlook 2019

With late cycle features continuing to materialise and a higher level of vulnerability developing due to the uncertain geopolitical backdrop, 2019 will require investors to embrace a more prudent approach, despite the benign global economic outlook. 

In our view, this new investment landscape will translate into not only the need for more cautious risk allocation through the year, but also more selective exposure to countries/sectors and names that could prove to be more resilient: less indebted, less exposed to geopolitical frictions, and to financial and economic imbalances. The sustainability of future returns will be the name of the game in 2019. It will also be a year of higher focus on portfolio construction and diversification to balance risk, avoid crowded trades, and deal with multiple divergences that will likely materialise. Meanwhile, liquidity management will be even more critical as we enter uncharted waters associated with central bank (CB) liquidity tightening for the first time post the last financial crisis. With limited market directionality, and as swings are expected to be frequent, investors should seek tactical opportunities throughout the year that will emerge on the basis of the evolution of three main themes, as noted below.

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Head Office
90, boulevard Pasteur
Paris
75015
France
Company website:
http://www.amundi.com
Year Founded:
2010
No. of investment offices worldwide:
6

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  • Cross Asset Investment Strategy - June 2019

    Cross Asset Investment Strategy - June 2019

    White papersFri, 7 Jun 2019

    After weeks of relative stability, the threat of a trade war has returned, shaking investor confidence and awakening markets from complacency. However, while there is still a significant optimism in the market that a deal can be struck, we believe that the risk of disappointment leading to another wave of volatility remains significant.

  • The 2020 US Presidential Election: Another Close Race?

    White papersThu, 6 Jun 2019

    President Donald Trump’s performance on the US economy gives him a significant advantage over his Democratic rivals heading into the 2020 election. However, Trump has consistently polled poorly with voters on character issues including leadership, temperament and management skills. The potential fallout from the Mueller report and ongoing House investigations remain wildcards. The 2020 election could be another close call, possibly a 50-50 tossup at this stage ...

  • Indian elections: political continuity is positive but reform is what matters most

    Indian elections: political continuity is positive but reform is what matters most

    White papersWed, 29 May 2019

    Prime Minister Modi led the NDA to a sweeping victory, with a full majority in Parliament and therefore significant political capital. There was some apprehension in the market ahead of the election and a clear majority will certainly soothe nerves.

  • European elections: not a game changer, opportunities from divergences

    European elections: not a game changer, opportunities from divergences

    White papersTue, 28 May 2019

    The results are broadly in line with what opinion polls had indicated, although with a slight “pro-institution” surprise. Key takeaways are, first, a decline in the votes for the two large political groups which are the social-democrats and the Christian-democrats or moderate right; these two parties had, since 1979, commanded a combined majority in the European Parliament, and this is now over.

  • High Yield: Oasis In Search For Yield?

    High Yield: Oasis In Search For Yield?

    White papersThu, 23 May 2019

    Since early 2016, US HY default rates have experienced a sort of “mini –cycle”, peaking at the end of 2016. Nevertheless, the recent rise and fall movements appear mostly commodity driven: default rates would have remained fairly stable if energy and material sectors were excluded from calculations.

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